INFRASTRUCTURE MASTER PLAN

 

The Village of Lions Bay is responsible for the provision of a wide range of infrastructure that is vital to the well-being of the citizens and the proper functioning of the community. By addressing our infrastructure needs, the Village of Lions Bay will be more likely to avoid costly infrastructure failures that cause considerable disruption to the community.

Infrastructure is a key element of Council’s Strategic Plan. Council’s approval of the Infrastructure Master Plan is the first step in moving forward with plans to implement the critical projects identified for the first five years. This includes several project that are focused on the safety and security of water storage and distribution as well as fixing stormwater issues and affected roads and bridges. Completing these projects will help to ensure Lions Bay continues to have clean, safe and reliable drinking water, and roads and bridges that are secure with proper drainage to prevent safety issues from flooding and property damage. 

The total anticipated cost for the capital projects identified for the next five years is approximately $9.2 million. It is not feasible to cover these costs using taxes alone; therefore, the Village’s plan is to apply for grants for $6.2 million or more and pursue a loan for $3 million as a combined approach to cover costs while minimizing impact on taxes. The Village is holding a referendum on November 19, 2016 to seek approval from local residents to move forward with the loan application.

Click here to learn more about the Loan Authorization Bylaw and Referendum.

With the Infrastructure Master Plan in place, Lions Bay is able to take advantage of a short window of opportunity to apply for federal and provincial grants to help pay for the failing infrastructure in the community. It’s essential to deal with these projects now, to maximize our opportunities to leverage new grant funding and to help prevent infrastructure failure which could put lives and property at risk and impede delivery of critical services such as safe, reliable drinking water. 

 

INFRASTRUCTURE MASTER PLAN HIGHLIGHTS

This overarching planning document is aimed at ensuring the long-term sustainability of the Village of Lions Bay’s water, wastewater, stormwater, roads, and bridge infrastructure. 

  • The Infrastructure Master Plan provides a plan to address critical infrastructure that poses risks to community safety and essential services, as well as a strategic approach for long-term management of our infrastructure.
  • Completing this plan is an essential element for understanding where we need to focus resources over the next five years, and as a required step to apply for funding and grants.
  • The plan has a 30-year forecast for our infrastructure that identifies existing and future risks to the condition, capacity and regulatory compliance of the Village’s infrastructure so we can improve the way we manage our infrastructure in the long term
  • The initial focus on the plan is on the critical projects we must address as soon as possible to protect community safety. These projects have been bundled into a five-year capital projects plan.
  • The projects targeted over the next five years are not optional – every one of them is on the critical risk list.
  • These projects to address our aging infrastructure are needed to ensure we have clean, safe and reliable drinking water, and roads and bridges that are secure with proper drainage to prevent flooding and property damage.

 

FIVE-YEAR CAPITAL PROJECT PLAN

The following is an overview of the at-risk infrastructure targeted for replacement and improvements as part of the five-year capital projects plan. 

      1. Safety and security of water and stormwater distribution network

WATER MAINS

Benefits: Watermains act like arteries and capillaries transporting potable water throughout the Village of Lions Bay.

Why needed:The original cast iron and asbestos cement lines are reaching the end of their service lives. In the case of the cast iron lines, corrosion has reduced the carrying capacity significantly (analogous to atherosclerosis). Moreover, many of the existing watermains are undersized and cannot provide adequate fire flows.

Risks: Unexpected infrastructure failures will result in:

  1. Water – loss of potable water for extended periods of time (weeks to months)
  2. Roads – road washouts could result in significant infrastructure damage and stranding of residents for extended periods.
  3. Resident property – significant damage to residences and vehicles including total loss.
  4. Personal injury – failure could result in significant injury and even loss of life.

Environment – destruction of entire ecosystems and loss of terrestrial and aquatic flora and fauna.

Infrastructure Master Plan Project Numbers: 1, 8, 12, 13, 16, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 35, 39, 40, 47, and 53 

 

PRESSURE REDUCING VALVE STATIONS

Benefits: Pressure Reducing Valves act to moderate pressures within the pipe network. They save water, increase the service life of the pipe network, and reduce the risk of damage to the pipe network. 

Why needed: The majority of the Villages’ pressure reducing valves have exceeded their average service life of 25 years. Existing valves are showing signs of deterioration including significant internal corrosion, failure of controls, piping, and strainers. Safety standards have improved since many of these stations were involved and all of the existing pressure reducing valve stations do not meet current WorkSafeBC requirements for protection of workers and entry.

Risks: Unexpected infrastructure failures will result in:

  1. Water – loss of potable water for extended periods of time (weeks to months)
  2. Roads – road washouts could result in significant infrastructure damage and stranding of residents for extended periods.
  3. Resident property – significant damage to residences and vehicles including total loss.
  4. Personal injury – failure could result in significant injury and even loss of life.

Environment – destruction of entire ecosystems and loss of terrestrial and aquatic flora and fauna.

Infrastructure Master Plan Project Numbers: 57 and 58

 

DRAINAGE SYSTEMS

Benefits: Drainage systems act to protect road surface and subgrade from deterioration and mass failure.  Drainage systems also act to collect and convey stormwater to discharge points effectively eliminating flooding and property damage.

 Why needed: The Village’s stormwater system is limited and inadequate. Deteriorated stormwater infrastructure, infill and encroachment of established features, and insufficient capacity have led to deteriorating roads throughout the Village.

Risks: Unexpected infrastructure failures will result in:

  1. Roads – road washouts could result in significant infrastructure damage and stranding of residents for extended periods.
  2. Resident property – significant damage to residences and vehicles including total loss.
  3. Personal injury – failure could result in significant injury and even loss of life.
  4. Environment – destruction of entire ecosystems and loss of terrestrial and aquatic flora and fauna.

 

 Infrastructure Master Plan Project Numbers:1, 12, 47, and 39 

 

 

      2. Safety and security of water storage system

 

WATER TANKS

Benefits: Tanks provide crucial supply during emergencies such as fire flow. They minimize pressure variation during periods of high consumption. They provide contact time for disinfectants to inactivate pathogens. They provide pressure surge relief.

Why needed:The last inspection of the Village’s water tanks was completed in 2004. The inspections identified significant issues including seismic deficiencies, leakage, corrosion, and overall deterioration of the tanks. In particular, the 1960’s tanks, have exceeded the average service life of 50 years.

Risks: Unexpected infrastructure failures will result in:

  1. Water – loss of potable water for extended periods of time (weeks to months)
  2. Roads – road washouts could result in significant infrastructure damage and stranding of residents for extended periods.
  3. Resident property – significant damage to residences and vehicles including total loss.
  4. Personal injury – failure could result in significant injury and even loss of life.
  5. Environment – destruction of entire ecosystems and loss of terrestrial and aquatic flora and fauna.

 Infrastructure Master Plan Project Numbers: 33, 38, 52, and 56

   

      3. Prioritized road and bridge repairs 

 

ROADS AND BRIDGES

Benefits: Provide access across creeks, rivers and other natural features. Many of the Villages bridges have watermains suspended beneath them.

Why needed:Bridges were last inspected in 2004 with the deficiencies remaining unaddressed. Corrosion of internal steel and deterioration of structural components is occurring and needs to be addressed in order to increase bridge life expectancy. Many of the bridges also act to convey water across natural structures

Risks: Unexpected infrastructure failures will result in:

  1. Water – loss of potable water for extended periods of time (weeks to months)
  2. Access – loss of access to and from residences, schools, and facilities.
  3. Personal injury – failure could result in significant injury and loss of life.
  4. Environment – destruction of entire ecosystems and loss of terrestrial and aquatic flora and fauna.

Infrastructure Master Plan Project Numbers: 17, 28, 31, and 32


PO Box 141 - 400 Centre Road - Lions Bay - British Columbia - V0N 2E0 - CANADA - P: 604 921 9333 - F: 604 921 6643